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WTVR Ch 6.com: Virginians Gather for "Broken Hearts Day" Print

BY JERRITA PATTERSON, WTVR Reporter

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RICHMOND, Va. (WTVR) - More than 50 people gathered in a conference room inside the General Assembly building Tuesday morning, for "Broken Hearts" Day at the Capitol. Members of the group, Virginia Organizing, came from all over the Commonwealth to express its disappointment with some legislators.

Virginia Organizing not only assembled to voice their concerns, but also to take action. The group passed out empty heart-shaped boxes to lawmakers. Instead of candy, a note was placed inside the box that read, "Disappointed? So are we!"

The group says the empty or broken hearts they were giving out, stand for broken promises from legislators. Virginia Organizing says Republicans are continuing to focus on social issues, including the one gun per month legislation, restricting gay adoptions and drug testing public assistance recipients. Instead the group declares there are more important issues to be addressed, like helping Virginians get back to work.

However Republican Delegate Kirk Cox say the "social issues" represent a small number of legislation up for consideration.

"It's a very small percentage," said Cox. "It's ironic because it's almost a self-fulfilling prophecy because a lot of times the Democrats will debate those issues for hours and complain we spend too much time on them. You can't have it both ways."

Democratic Delegate Patrick Hope is backing the group, and says Republicans are focused on old social battles that have caused Virginia to become "a national laughing stock."

"The Republican response is, it's only been 3 percent of all the bills that's being focused on this social right-wing agenda," said Democratic Delegate Patrick Hope. "But it's kind of like going to a doctor and they tell you, you have cancer but it's not in the rest of your body, it's only in your pancreas. This is really setting Virginians back."

But it wasn't all disagreements; both Delegate Kirk Cox and Patrick Hope acknowledge the economy and transportation projects remain a priority.


 



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